10/02/2018 · How to Write an Essay

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These awards are intended to help meet the education costs of future business owners and leaders. To be considered for one of the scholarships, applicants must submit an essay providing insight into how technology affects work environments. High school graduates and current college students may apply.

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7 Tips For Writing a Killer College Essay | HuffPost

Return to College strives to help students find a school and degree program that’s the right fit for them. They also provide resources for adults returning to school. Scholarship applicants must write a three sentence essay explaining why they are pursuing a college degree. Students may submit multiple entries.

13/09/2017 · How to Write About Yourself. Writing about yourself can seem embarrassing at first. Cover letters, personal essays, and …

Siddhi Yoga is committed to providing yogis all over the world tips and tricks for advancing their yoga practice and taking it to the next level. Siddhi Yoga believes in community and believes that education should be accessible to everyone. In support of their community, they offer a scholarship to any student in high school or college. Each student must submit an essay outlining how yoga has impacted their life.

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How to Write About Yourself (with Examples) - wikiHow

We read Julius Caesar that year (still one of my favorite plays of all time, by the way!), and even back than I found it to be a wonderful, character-driven drama; I mostly loved the character of Cassius, and I re-read his dialogue carefully, trying to understand his rhetorical strategies as he convinced Brutus to kill his friend--Caesar--for the good of the government. As we got deeper into the play, I wanted to write about Cassius and Brutus during those 10-20 minutes we were given for our journals, but I couldn't; instead, I was forced to write to our teacher's prompts, which sounded something like --"Do you believe in prophecy? Why or why not? If so, what convinced you? If not, what would change your mind?" See, my tenth grade teacher wanted us to focus in on the famous quotes from the play, like "Beware the Ides of March," which explains the type of journal prompts he was giving us. My teacher wanted us to write quietly, then he wanted to share all of his own personal stories about why he kind of believed in prophecy. I had no problem discussing his area of interest from the play--prophecy--, but years later I can't help but think that we could have had some much richer whole-class, socratic seminars--or heck, even just informal discussions--if we had a choice to a) respond to the teacher's prompt, or to b) explore a different literature-based idea that we could bring to the table based on what we were finding interesting in the literature. How hard would giving us a choice have been for him? What always struck me as the most interesting thing about that teacher's Julius Caesar unit was that everyone in my class was assigned the exact same essay topic as our summative assessment to the unit; it was something like, "How do the dreams of men and the idea of prophecy shape our thinking about the future?" I wrote a lackluster essay, I'm sure, because I didn't care about that topic; now, had he allowed me to write about Cassius and his persuasive skills, I would have given him a killer essay. I truly would have.

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Students can win up to $2,000 for college by writing an essay discussing whether public school calendars should accommodate religious holidays in the 2018 Religious Liberty Essay Scholarship Contest. To enter, students must write an 800-1,200 word essay responding to the following prompt:

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If you’ve read the book The Tempest, this could be your chance to win $1,000 for college. Signet Classics is offering five $1,000 scholarships to high school and home schooled students who write an essay on a specific topic in the book.